Jacques Ravel

I am a Professor of Microbiology and Immunology and the Associate Director for Genomics at the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. I am a trained Microbial Ecologist who is applying modern genomics technologies and ecological principles to characterize the role and dynamics of the microbial communities inhabiting the human body in health and disease and better define the interactions between the host, the microbes and the environment that drive these ecological systems. 

Garry Myers

I am an Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. My research interests center on deciphering the biology of the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that make up the genus Chlamydia. My group uses modern genomics tools and techniques, including novel RNA-Seq and epigenetic sequencing methods, to examine both Chlamydia and the host cell. These approaches have allowed us to identify the myriad immune dampening strategies of Chlamydia and gain insight into the fibrotic disease outcomes of chlamydial infection.

David Rasko

I am an Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. I was trained in classical molecular pathogenesis and I now combine these classic methods with high-throughput approaches to study pathogenesis, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic development .  In combination with pathogenesis studies the Rasko group examines the evolution of human bacterial pathogens with a focus on enteric pathogens, such as E. coli and Shigella.

Emmanuel Mongodin

 

As an Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, my research focuses on translating genome-based knowledge into the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for infectious diseases involving S. aureus, a major human opportunistic pathogen. My research seeks to characterize the interplay between S. aureus, the human flora as well as the host response. My research plan capitalizes on the experience I have gained during my inter-disciplinary post-doctoral fellowship (genomics, comparative genomics, metagenomics and microbiology) and my graduate work (in vitro and ex-vivo models of host-pathogen interactions). This background ensures that my laboratory will make significant long-term contributions towards elucidating the preventive role of the microbial flora against colonization and invasion by bacterial pathogens such as S. aureus.

 

Florian Fricke

 

 

Julie Dunning Hotopp

I am an Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore and a member of the Greenebaum Cancer Center. I study the genomics of bacteria-host interactions with a particular emphasis on the sharing of DNA between microbes and their hosts through lateral gene transfer.